Stay for a Coffee, and Maybe Buy Me One Too

Why fit in when you were born to stand out?

Dr. Seuss

Over the last few months I have been considering Patreon and Ko-fi as options to give fans of my work more access to me as a creator. It has taken some consideration, and I have decided to go with… Ko-fi!

Maybe this isn’t a surprise as my page has been accessible since October, but the current plan I’m using is Free. The change will be that I’m moving to Ko-fi Gold, a subscription to both support Ko-fi’s development and to give me access to a number of features that I can put to good use for those following and supporting my work.

I am aiming to be ready to go early February.

As a note, this does not mean my blog and portfolio won’t be updated anymore. However, how I update will change. Ko-fi will be updated first with work in progress and final images, and have some exclusive content. I’m still working out the exact changes, and feedback is not just welcome but heavily encouraged.

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Review; Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe

Gender Queer
Maia Kobabe (Goodreads Author) (Author, Illustrator), Phoebe Kobabe (Goodreads Author) (Colorist)

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Summary from Goodreads:

In 2014, Maia Kobabe, who uses e/em/eir pronouns, thought that a comic of reading statistics would be the last autobiographical comic e would ever write. At the time, it was the only thing e felt comfortable with strangers knowing about em. Now, Gender Queer is here. Maia’s intensely cathartic autobiography charts eir journey of self-identity, which includes the mortification and confusion of adolescent crushes, grappling with how to come out to family and society, bonding with friends over erotic gay fanfiction, and facing the trauma and fundamental violation of pap smears. Started as a way to explain to eir family what it means to be nonbinary and asexual, Gender Queer is more than a personal story: it is a useful and touching guide on gender identity-what it means.

Goodreads.com

I have never come across a book that so closely captured the feeling of dysphoria that I felt growing up. Mine was caused by different things, but much of how I dealt with it is mirrored in portions of this graphic novel.

I invented and named a lost male twin who had always felt like he should be a girl. If I could just find him we would both finally feel like whole complete people.

Gender Queer, Maia Kobabe

This book is an amazing read and so honest and open. I didn’t know it, but I needed to read it. I picked it up out of curiosity, thinking I may learn something. I didn’t expect to get so much out of it, though.