Review; They Called us Enemy

They Called Us Enemy
by George Takei (co-writer),
Justin Eisinger (co-writer),
Steven Scott (co-writer),
Harmony Becker (Artist)

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Summary from Goodreads:

In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten “relocation centers,” hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard.

They Called Us Enemy is Takei’s firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother’s hard choices, his father’s faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future.

What is American? Who gets to decide? When the world is against you, what can one person do? To answer these questions, George Takei joins co-writers Justin Eisinger & Steven Scott and artist Harmony Becker for the journey of a lifetime.

Goodreads.com

George Takei’s The Called Us Enemy is a captivating work of art. The story he has to tell is a horrible one, and one of great injustice to a portion of America’s citizens. And it’s one story that is, unfortunately, still relevant today. There are terrible acts going on in America today, right now, and while this is a tale of the country’s history it’s also relevant to the present day.

The art of this book is also spot-on, and Harmony Becker’s attention to detail is admirable. The artistic style works in unison with the story, hitting the high and low points with precision.

I picked it up today, intending to sit down and read a few pages, and finished the book without moving from my spot. This is a book I would recommend to everyone. There are great lessons to learn here, and should be considered required reading.